EOP Escalates Fight Against High-Confidence Phish

A change due in December will improve how Exchange Online Protection suppresses high confidence phish messages and stop them being delivered to user mailboxes. The old-fashioned allowed sender and allowed domain lists are being taken out of the equation and ignored when EOP is sure that it’s dealing with some high-confidence phish. It’s time to check your anti-spam policies.

Signs of a Phishing Attempt Based on Office VoIP Voicemail Notifications

A crude phishing attempt based on voicemail notifications from a VoIP service arrived in mailboxes. It’s easy for experienced users to pick up signs to stay away, but the unwary can be trapped. Report samples of phishing attempts to Microsoft to make Exchange Online Protection better and keep on educating users.

Phishing Attempt to Grab Office 365 User Credentials

Office 365 users might receive a phishing attempt to say that they’ve just been paid by a UK healthcare group. The message shows some obvious signs to tell the recipient that it only contains trouble, but these signs are easier for humans to pick up than they are for machine learning. The combination of good message hygiene and user education should be enough to deflect phishing attacks.

Exchange Online Protection Improves Zero-Hour Auto Purge (ZAP)

The fight against spam and malware goes on unabated. ZAP, or zero-hour auto purge, is an Exchange Online Protection (EOP) feature that’s getting some extra features to deal better with spam and phish malware. New policy controls are available to control the feature.

Phishing: Your Document Has Been Completed

Phishing attacks through email happen all the time. A new relatively crude one arrived today. It’s easy for the trained eye to detect phishing, but do your Office 365 admins know how to use the tools available in Exchange Online Protection to suppress malware, and do your users know the signs of bad email? In this case, it’s an invitation to click to get to a PDF document to bring you to digitaloceanspaces.com. Some interesting things might happen afterwards, but I really don’t want to find out what occurs when I click the link.

Phishing: Sample Messages Delivered to Exchange Online Mailboxes

Another day, another phishing attempt, this time trying to make unwary Office 365 administrators click on a link to “Retrieve Pending Messages” for their domain. I’m surprised this one got through! Some other examples from November 2019 are included for your review. Make sure that you report these bad boys when they arrive into user mailboxes

Phishing: EFile Document Notification

A very exciting message arrived in my mailbox. So exciting that it was too good to be true. Some basic checks made me more suspicious and then Outlook’s Message Header Analyzer gave more evidence to think the message was bad.