Microsoft Clamps Down on Old Teams Desktop Clients

In an Office 365 notification to tenants, Microsoft says that the Modern Lifecycle Policy means that users must keep the Teams desktop up-to-date. The result is that users must make sure that their desktop client is no more than three months behind the latest software. If it is, they won’t be able to use the desktop client until it is updated.

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Report Old Guest Accounts and Their Membership of Office 365 Groups

Office 365 applications create lots of Azure Active Directory guest accounts. Here’s how to find old accounts and check their Office 365 group membership. If you know the accounts that are old and stale and aren’t members of any Office 365 group, you can consider removing them from your tenant.

Report Office 365 License Assignments to User Accounts

The Office 365 Admin Center includes reports of licenses assigned to users. The same information can be extracted with PowerShell, which means that you can analyze license assignments anyway you wish. The script is quick and easy, mostly because its error handling is non-existent, but it’s enough to get going.

Teams Makes New Filters Available

The Teams desktop and browser clients now offer the ability to filter personal chats and channels. Filtering is a useful feature, but it does draw the attention to the lack of precision in the Teams search function that really needs a revamp if Teams is to be taken seriously as a “hub for teamwork.”

The Many Ways to Report Teams Usage Data

The Teams desktop and browser clients now boasts the ability to report per-team and cross-team analytics. The information is interesting (at least the first time you look at it), but some doubts remain about its accuracy when the different methods of reporting are checked against each other. I’m sure it’s nothing more than timing, synchronization, or something else getting in the way.