Using PowerShell to Add Teams to the Groups Expiration Policy

How best to add every team in your tenant to the Office 365 Groups Expiration Policy? Well, one way is to check all groups for Teams. Another is to use Get-Team to return the set of teams and process those. But then you should think about how to mark the teams that are in the policy in such a way that you don’t process them again. It’s easy to do this with one of the Exchange Online custom attributes.

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Limiting SharePoint Storage for Teams

One of the great things about Teams is the way that it orchestrates Office 365 resources like SharePoint Online sites. The downside is that a tenant’s valuable SharePoint storage quota might be absorbed by a profusion of Teams. To offset the problem, you can apply lower limits to sites belonging to Teams and the best approach is to use PowerShell for the job.

Finding the SharePoint URLs for Teams

Every Office 365 group (and team) has a SharePoint site. But how to find the URLs of all the sites used by teams in a tenant. One PowerShell answer came from Syskit, but it’s an old technique and we can do better now by fetching a list of teams in the tenant and then retrieving the URL for each team-enabled group.

Office 365 Groups and the ProvisioningOption property

Some will tell you that you can figure out what resources an Office 365 Group is connected to by checking the ProvisioningOption property with the Get-UnifiedGroup cmdlet. Well, you can’t. If you want to do something like check for team-enabled groups, you’ll need a different approach.